Conditions of Living in Afghanistan

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Afghanistan is a landlocked country in South Asia, with a population of nearly thirty million people. As one of the poorest countries in the world, Afghanistan has faced decades of conflict, war, and instability. A tenuous peace settled after the 2001 US-led invasion that toppled Taliban rule. The security remains precarious as insurgents fight government forces and each other for power amid an ongoing Taliban insurgency.


Much of the fighting stems from the major ethnic groups in Afghanistan. Pashtuns make up more than half of the population, followed by Tajiks, Uzbeks, Hazaras, and minor groups such as Lurs. The country emerged after decades of war and rule by a series of powerful dynasties. There have been seven presidents since 1989, none with a clear mandate to rule or lasting political support.

History Of Afghanistan


Afghanistan gained independence from Britain in 1919, after the First World War. Under King Amanullah Khan, a reformist who oversaw some of the first steps towards the modernization of Afghanistan. It introduced economic reforms such as abolishing slavery and introducing compulsory education.
In the ’30s, Afghanistan experienced an era of stability with peace between monarchists and Islamists. Before WWII, Afghanistan’s relations with neighboring countries deteriorated, and on August 19, 1939, they were invaded by Russia supported by England.

Who are the Taliban?


The Taliban is a Sunni Islamic movement that ruled Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001. They had fought wars against the Afghan communist government, the Soviet occupation army, and the Northern warlords before their rule. In 1994 they took over Kabul and established an Islamist emirate.
The Taliban were initially popular among Afghans weary of warfare and poverty but soon alienated many by imposing hardline Islamic laws, such as issuing lengthy prison terms for men who trimmed their beards or letting women walk without a male escort.
The Taliban were also accused of failing to protect women’s rights and ended education for girls.


In late December 2001, the Afghan capital Kabul fell to the US-backed Northern Alliance, a loose coalition of ethnic Tajiks, Uzbeks, and Hazaras.
A few weeks later, the last Taliban stronghold in southern Kandahar was captured by US forces. Fighting continued in locations across the country between different factions seeking control of territory and resources.

Conditions of Women under Taliban rule?


With the Taliban takeover of Herat in 1995, they enforced a dress code for women, requiring them to wear an all-enveloping burqa any time they were outside their home.
They also restricted women from leaving their homes unless accompanied by a close male relative and treated by male doctors.
As a result of these restrictions, maternal and child health deteriorated markedly, and life expectancy fell to 44 years.

No girls were registered in school from 6 to 10 years, and no girl was allowed to sit on a chair in government schools.
Lack of education of girls led to the death of some of them.
At the age of 15–18 years, they had to live under guardians. After getting married, woman are required to spend most of their waking hours at their husbands’ village homes. Girls are not allowed to learn more than the Koran and cook and sew clothes.

At the age of 12–15 years, woman are forced to wear a burqa. After that, they were required to stay in their houses and read Koran till night.
They weren’t allowed to communicate with other persons outside their houses.
The well-educated and intelligent girls (in class 1–10) had to go out wearing a burqa or meet with her husband at his village as a housewife.

Conclusion


The Taliban regime was a dark period in the history of Afghanistan, especially for women and girls. During this time, there was no hope for education in Afghanistan.
In some cases, both men and women were killed because they did not want to obey the Taliban’s orders.
Education of girls was forbidden because women were considered as a step for the destruction of Islam.
This is evidence of gender inequality and injustice.
Women had no right to get education and career opportunities in their academic life.

About the author

Anwesha Mukherjee

Anwesha Mukherjee is a Digital Media Publisher and freelance writer. She has been working in the publishing industry for over 6 years now, holding various positions at different publishing houses across India. Her work experience includes managing marketing campaigns, content development and website maintenance for various industries including healthcare, IT, finance and education.

She also offers ghostwriting services to help aspiring authors get their book published while maintaining creative control over the project.

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Anwesha Mukherjee

Anwesha Mukherjee is a Digital Media Publisher and freelance writer. She has been working in the publishing industry for over 6 years now, holding various positions at different publishing houses across India. Her work experience includes managing marketing campaigns, content development and website maintenance for various industries including healthcare, IT, finance and education.

She also offers ghostwriting services to help aspiring authors get their book published while maintaining creative control over the project.

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